Addressing the "Invisible" Aspects of Living with IBD

For many people living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), taking care of their total health and well-being means addressing mental health. The physical symptoms of IBD can be disruptive, stigmatizing, and isolating. Symptoms can also be mentally exhausting – impacting a person’s psychological and emotional well-being.1,2 From missing out on daily activities and bigger life events with friends and family to worrying about travel, feeling concerned about treatment and the discomfort that can go hand-in-hand with IBD — the challenges experienced by those with IBD contribute to a heavy emotional burden.1,3


Rates of depression and anxiety are 2 to 3 times higher among people living with IBD compared with the general population.4 And while anyone with IBD can face emotional or mental health challenges, certain individuals, such as members of minority communities, may be at an even greater risk.5


The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the mental health crisis, and an increasing number of people living with IBD have sought mental health care. However, many in this community still are not receiving the help and attention they need and deserve.5 Given the more “invisible” nature of the mental and emotional impact of IBD, it can be difficult for people to find solutions that go beyond medication.


Solutions that treat the whole person by addressing physical, emotional, and mental health are important. Fortunately, an increasing number of resources and tools are accessible online that support mental well-being, including apps such as Headspace, Calm, and Sanvello Health.


Takeda has entered into a partnership with Sanvello, which brings the IBD community personalized mental health and well-being support anywhere, anytime, via the Sanvello app. This partnership provides up to 10,000 patients with IBD 1 year of free access to the Sanvello app regardless of coverage and 3 months of free on-demand access to individualized virtual mental health motivational coaching to commercially insured patients. Sanvello also has a wide array of other tools and educational content, as well as a community forum that offers peer-to-peer connection to both provide and receive additional support.


The hope is that partnerships and resources such as these, which focus on making meaningful and convenient mental health support more accessible to the IBD community, can ultimately make all aspects of IBD more visible and manageable for those living with the disease.


If you would like to access Sanvello, please visit https://www.sanvello.com/takeda.


Sponsored by Takeda Pharmaceuticals




References:

  1. Kemp K, Griffiths J, Lovell K. Understanding the health and social care needs of people living with IBD: a meta-synthesis of the evidence. World J Gastroenterol. 2012;18(43):6240-6249. doi:10.3748/wjg.v18.i43.6240

  2. Radford SJ, McGing J, Czuber-Dochan W, Moran G. Systematic review: the impact of inflammatory bowel disease-related fatigue on health-related quality of life. Frontline Gastroenterol. 2020;12(1):11-21. doi:10.1136/flgastro-2019-101355

  3. Lesnovska KP, Börjeson S, Hjortswang H, Frisman GH. What do patients need to know? Living with inflammatory bowel disease. J Clin Nurs. 2014;23(11-12):1718-1725. doi:10.1111/jocn.12321

  4. Bernstein CN, Hitchon CA, Walld R, et al. Increased burden of psychiatric disorders in inflammatory bowel disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019;25(2):360-368. doi:10.1093/ibd/izy235

5. Szigethy EM, Allen JI, Reiss M, et al. White paper AGA: the impact of mental and


psychosocial factors on the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Clin

Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017;15(7):986-997. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2017.02.037

56 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All